Book Reviews · memoirs

Snap Review: Minimalism – Live a Meaningful Life by Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus

Title: Minimalism – Live a Meaningful Life

My rating: 4/5

Synopsis:

Minimalism: Live a Meaningful Life is our finest, most important creation to date. It’s also the best thing we’ve ever written about Minimalism and will likely serve as the cornerstone to our work for years to come. It took us a year to write this book—a year of creating the best material possible and finding ways to relate it back to our lives so you would have practical ways to relate the subject matter to your life.


Snap Review:

Again, I’m a Minimalism believer! I noticed here very similar messaging with their Netflix documentary and their first book, Everything The Remains, but with more action steps to achieve success in the 5 dimensions they laid out as the most important:

  1. Health
  2. Relationships
  3. Passions
  4. Growth
  5. Contribution

I found myself being pushed more towards the Passions areas as it comes to spending time and energy on. The piece about what term we use when talking about what we do for a living (work, career, or mission) definitely made me think about how I approach each day that I’m not off. Additionally, I constantly wonder about what value is being added to my life and what changes I can make beyond the materialistic – what experiences, people, non-physical things are (or are not) adding value and worth my time and energy?

Inspiration for me to keep writing was not what I expected but came out in the Passion section when Joshua and Ryan were told “(y)ou should do something online. You could make an impact. The world needs people like you to help them see things more clearly.” And that is where I have seen my passions come through within blogging and social media!

Quotes for enlightenment:

“The point is that minimalism is a tool to help you achieve freedom. Freedom from fear, freedom from worry, freedom from overwhelm, freedom from guilt, freedom from depression, freedom from enslavement. Freedom. Real freedom” (Millburn and Nicodemus 27)

You can’t change the people around you, but you can change the people around you” (Millburn and Nicodemus 60)

“…when they lose their job. Sure, they worry about money and how  they’re going to make a living, but after the initial panic over subsides, they feel empty and insignificant without their job. That’s because people often give significance to something that is relatively unimportant” (Millburn and Nicodemus 79)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s