Title: Morocco, Maybe

Author: Alex Wu

Published: 2015

Pages: 280

Genre: Women’s Fiction, Chick-Lit

Format: Print copy mailed by the author in exchange for an honest review

My rating: 4/5

Synopsis:

An atmospheric love story …
Sara Meadows is an ambitious attorney who helps her mining-company client make billions, even if she has to bulldoze an ancient monastery and blackmail the opposition. Unsavory, true, especially since she once dreamed of a Ph.D. in art history, but soon she’ll make partner at an elite firm. Not bad for someone raised on food stamps. A vacation to Morocco shouldn’t screw up anything.
It screws up everything.
Backpacking through Morocco, Sara meets an archaeologist who seems everything she is not: idealistic, spontaneous, and as down-to-earth as his digs. They explore fabled kasbahs and medieval medinas, sharing tales under Saharan skies. Over sips of mint tea, the two discover a mutual passion for history. And fall in love.
Sara’s newfound happiness would be perfect but for one tiny detail: the priceless monastery she’s demolishing is the same one the archaeologist is desperate to save. Navigating unexpected detours is hard enough. Betraying someone she loves is harder. The hardest part? Mustering the courage to defy her head and follow her heart.


Review:

When I first started reading, Morocco, Maybe, I had several eye rolls as I immediately could tell that although a female narrator, it was written from a male perspective – not necessarily a bad thing, just an awareness as I believed this was going to be a long read. The first few chapters delved into what I call the stereotypical female brain as well as some cliches of relationships and engagements. I was waiting for something unique to occur without the predictability of a woman venturing on her own, woman finds man, woman is conflicted between new man and man back home, woman makes choice, etc. etc. Two thirds through the narrative, things escalated rather quickly where page after page had drama and action that makes your mind spin. In these instants, I appreciate the additions of social justice and protests in other countries as well as international law – adding a reality and bigger picture narrative to the themes of what one is fighting for.

The love story crafted for Sara and Kai is well developed and unraveled as the story progresses, especially when you think there is nothing more to learn. Where some love stories may seem repetitive and obvious, Wu showcases one that endures amongst multiple times of pain and deceit – still not being able to have what some may call a happy ending, but something real and cherished regardless of time. A quick read that can be categorized as Chick Lit, I believe Morocco, Maybe can be lifted up a peg to Women’s Fiction as it delivers strong female empowerment themes beyond what we would see in a beach read.

Read Morocco, Maybe if you like the themes of:

  • Adventure
  • Travel
  • Romance
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